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24 Feb 2018

Eddie Mottau "No Moulding" 1977 US Private Country Rock,Folk Rock


Eddie Mottau  "No Moulding" 1977 US Private Country Rock,Folk Rock

https://vk.com/wall312142499_9439


Boston-born guitarist Eddie Mottau has enjoyed a five-decade career that has carried him across a dozen or more crazes, waves, and other trends in music. From a boyhood interest in folk music, he formed a team with his friend Joe Hutchinson as Two Guys from Boston, who got to record a single for Scepter Records with Paul Stookey, of Peter, Paul & Mary, as producer. The duo eventually became the psychedelic folk-rock band Bo Grumpus, who relocated to New York to be recorded by Felix Pappalardi. That group – which for a time assumed the name Jolliver Arkansaw – lasted until 1970. 
• Mottau returned to Paul Stookey’s orbit, playing guitar and serving as co-producer of the latter’s first post-Peter, Paul & Mary solo album, Paul And. That project led to his crossing paths with John Lennon, which resulted in his working with Lennon’s live band, and to a gig playing with Lower East Side music rebel David Peel. Mottau recorded and released his first solo album, No Turning Around (MCA) – produced by Stookey – in 1973. And he was back working again with Lennon the following year, on Walls and Bridges, and again in 1975 on Rock ‘n’ Roll. Another solo album, No Moulding, followed in 1977. Mottau continues to play and record, but out of New Hampshire – where he has lived since the 1980s – rather than New York City. - Bruce Eder ….~


Eddie Mottau is a Boston-born American guitarist. His career has included membership in the bands Bo Grumpus and Mottau, Drew & Clark (with Jimmy Clark), and session work for musicians Noel Paul Stookey, John Lennon, Yoko Ono, and David Peel. 
Mottau played guitar on Lennon’s 1974 album Walls and Bridges, and also Rock 'n’ Roll, released in 1975. 
Mottau’s first solo album, No Turning Around, was released in 1973 on MCA Records. Guest artists included Felix Pappalardi and Gerry Mulligan. Motteau’s next album, No Moulding, was released in 1977. Mottau lives with his wife in rural New Hampshire, where he continues to write and perform folk-oriented music….~


Personel: 
Eddie Mottau - Vocals, 6 &12 Strings Guitar 
Noel Paul Stookey - Producer, Melodica on A3, Back-up Vocals on B5 
Eddie Ryan - Songwriting 
Jimmy Clark - Bass, Harmony Vocals 
Vic Hyman - Acoustic & Electric Guitar, Back-up Vocals on B5 
Wayne Cadrain - Harmonica, Bells & Knees 
Walter Holt - 12 Strings Guitar, Harmony Vocals on A5 
Stu Davis - Assistant Engineer, Back-up Vocals on B5 
Elaine Sutherland - Back-up Vocals on B5 
Bob Wilson - Photograph & Art Work, Back-up Vocals on B5 
Elizabeth Stookey - Back-up Vocals on B5 
Anna Stookey - Back-up Vocals on B5 
Kate Stookey - Back-up Vocals on B5 







 Side One: 
A1. Glory Of Love (Billy Hill) - 02:48 
A2. I Love You (Eddie Mottau, Eddie Ryan & Jimmy Clark) - 03:09 
A3. Living The Life Of Riley (Eddie Mottau & Jimmy Clark) - 03:41 
A4. Empty Pockets Blues (Seeger & Hayes) - 02:45 
A5. Starting From Scratch (Eddie Mottau & Walter Holt) - 03:10 
A6. This Year (Eddie Mottau & Jimmy Clark) - 03:06 
• Side Two: 
B1. Jazz-Bo-Brown (Adapted & Arranged by Eddie Mottau) - 03:31 
B2. For You (Eddie Mottau & Eddie Ryan) - 02:34 
B3. Whistle A Tune (Eddie Mottau & Eddie Ryan) - 02:34 
B4. The Winner (Noel Paul Stookey) - 03:32 
B5. Jesus Is On The Mainline (Adapted & Arranged by Eddie Mottau) - 02:35 
B6. Morning Dancer (Jimmy Clark) - 03:38 

Cashman Vaquero Band “In Memory Of Berry Oakley” 1979 US Private Prog Jazz Country Blues Rock



Cashman Vaquero Band  “In Memory Of Berry Oakley” 1979 US very rare Private Prog Jazz Country Blues Rock
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Recorded in San Francisco’s Far Out Studios and produced by James Mason Davis, most references describe 1979’s “In Memory of Berry Oakley” as being Allman Brothers-styled Southern rock. That’s not quite right. I certainly hear Allman-influences, particularly in some of the Cashman-Sadus guitar interplay, but the set’s far more diverse than that. With the exception of a mildly-jazzy cover of John Mayall’s ‘California’, the set boasts original material that finds the band taking stabs at conventional boogie ('Down In the Belly’), country-rock (the pretty ballad 'Driving Me Crazy’) lite-jazz ('View from a Mountain Peak’) and even Santana-styled Latin rock ('Security’). Cashman and Sadus share vocal duties and they both have pretty good voices. Judging by the liner notes Sadus apparently died while the album was being made, but between his work and that of guest guitarist Robert John Guziejka (who contributed a couple of songs and played with Cashman and Oakley in their garage band days), there are quite a few tasty lead guitars scattered throughout the set including some Duane Allman-styled runs on 'Good Days’ and some jazzy scatting on 'There’s No Tellin’. Curiously, at least to my ears the biographical tribute title track is the leas impressive effort….~


Very rare lp that’s pigeon holed as a Allman brothers tribute. While it has some element of that in the guitar play, the lp is much more adventurous The boys take shots at boogie rock. jazzy progrock. latin rock, country rock all done with great vocals and intelliegent playing! “Good Days” is a highlight for me. I stumbled onto a couple copies and now you benefit from that. Doug Cashman hung out in Macon and jammed with Jaimoe (the drummer who was co-founder of the Allman Bros Band) for a time. Got to know Berry and included thememorial song on his album produced in the bay area in 1979. Lead guitarist James Vincent went on to sign a solo deal with Columbia ..~


Doug Cashman put this album together in 1978 and was self-promoting it back in 1978. It’s his first LP that has not been circulated much. As Doug live in Frisco back then and use to come to Macon to visit where his old Chicago friend had lived. He knew Berry around Chicago before the Allman Brothers or Second Coming Band…~


“Vaquero or cowboy is the name I picked after we put out the 45, because James Vincent got signed to Caribou Records and I couldn’t use his name. Cowboy was a Capricorn [Records] act and didn’t want to use that name. I decided on Vaquero because I had worked on a cattle ranch and [had done] some bareback bronco riding in Utah. 
As for the album title, Ron Sadus the bassist wrote the instrumental 
tune and I added the lyrics. The instrumental tune has a beautiful twin guitar solo throughout the tune. When we did it in the studio, I had completely 
rearranged the tune and that was the last time I performed that tune. 
Bob Guziejka (ga-j-ka) (guitar), Ron Sadus (drums), Berry Oakley (guitar), and the late Jerry Kokas (bass) had a band together (The Vibratones). I didn’t play in that band, but Bob, Ron [then on bass] and myself playing drums had a trio called "Satish-chada” from 1968 to 1971. I moved to California in 1971 and Ron and Bob came out to California in February of 1972. We went into Wally Heiders Studio in LA and did a few recording sessions. The only tunes that sounded good were 'Good Days’, 'Drivin Me Crazy’ and 'Security.’ Ron and Bob went 
back to Chicago and those tapes sat in the can until 1975. I met James Vincent in San Francisco where I was working as a street artist in 1975. We got together and rehearsed some of my tunes in Marin. In April 1975 we went 
into Wally Heiders with the other musicians and recorded [what was to become] side 2 of the album live. The lead guitar on 'California’ and 'Down In the Belly were later overdubbed by Joel Manchak in Chicago. The lead guitar on 'Security’, the twin leads on 'Good Days’ and all of the leads on side 2 were by Vincent. The 45 [we released] had just a slight difference in the final mix. Sadly, Sadus passed away in July 1978. He was 30 years old. The album was released in 1979.“ …Doug Cashman 2004…~


Credits 
Alto Saxophone – Lenny Mazza 
Backing Vocals – Debbi Turpin (tracks: A2), Mike Villagomez (tracks: A1) 
Bass – Roger Paskett 
Bass, Acoustic Guitar, Rhythm Guitar, Alto Vocals – Ron Sadus 
Cello – Gael Alcock 
Drums – Tom Donlinger 
Engineer – Ed Lapple 
Graphics – Conger Brandhorst Pierce 
Guitar – James Vincent 
Guitar, Vocals – Robert John Guziejka (tracks: A3) 
Lead Guitar, Slide Guitar – Joel Manchak 
Pedal Steel Guitar – Bob Lee (13) 
Percussion – Barry Thomas (3) 
Piano – Will Paskett 
Producer – James Mason Davis 
Rhythm Guitar, Drums, Percussion, Vocals – Doug Cashman



Tracklist 
1 California
2 Down in the Belly
3 Drivin Me Crazy
4 Security
5 Good Days
6 Mountain Peak
7 There’s No Tellin
8 In Memory of Berry Oakley
9 San Francisco Sunset 

The Mauds “Hold On” 1967 US Garage Rock,Soul Rock


The Mauds “Hold On” 1967 US Garage Rock,Soul Rock 
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The Mauds were an influential band in the 1960s Chicago music “garage band” scene that included The Buckinghams, The Cryan Shames, New Colony Six, The Ides Of March and Shadows of Knight. The Mauds was founded in 1965 by Bill Durling, rhythm guitar. Bill knew Jimy Rogers from 1964 and convinced him to start singing lead for Bill’s band. Jimy and Bill then asked Billy Winter, bass, Robert “Fuzzy” Fuscaldo, lead guitar and Craig Baumgard, drums to join and the Mauds were born. These musicians built the Mauds unmistakable Blue-Eyed Soul Sound c.1965 to 1967. The name Mauds was a play on the 1960s British slang expression “mod”, which meant modern. Bill Durling went off to college in Storm Lake, Iowa was replaced by Timmy Coniglio on rhythm guitar and brass, Craig Baumgard was replaced by Phil Weinberg on drums. Later, Denny Horan replaced Weinberg and Bill Winter was replaced by Bill Sunter.
It was Shadows frontman/vocalist Jimy Sohns who first discovered and championed The Mauds in 1966. Sohns helped get them find gigs and was instrumental in their signing with Dunwich Records distributed by Mercury Records, where in 1967 they gained fame with their debut single, a cover of the Sam & Dave hit “Hold On” penned by David Porter and Isaac Hayes.[2][3] The song was recorded at the original Chess Studios in Chicago, home to blues giants Willie Dixon, Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley and Chuck Berry. The Rolling Stones had recorded their second album there in 1964. The single charted locally at No. 15 on WCFL and No. 11 on WLS radio. The single may have gone higher, but a censorship controversy erupted when WLS got complaints about the lyrics, “Reach out to me for satisfaction; on my knees for quick reaction.” A cleaned-up version was recorded for WLS but the songs momentum was slowed.

A full album of material was recorded called “Hold On” that yielded several other singles, including “When Something is Wrong with my Baby,” “He Will Break Your Heart,” and “Knock On Wood” which became a No. 1 hit in Japan. The Mauds version of “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy” an instrumental jazz hit by Cannonball Adderley, written by Joe Zawinul had soulful lyrics written by Curtis Mayfield (though credited to Vincent & Gail Fisher Levy)[5] especially for them. Mayfield was so happy with the way they did his “You Must Believe Me,” complete with Impressions-styled harmonies, that he promised to write several songs just for them. Jimy Rogers often lamented that unfortunately, their version was recorded around the same time (1967) as the Buckinghams more famous version, which had different lyrics and ended up being a No. 5 national hit. Two originals were included, “C’mon and Move” by Rogers and Fuscaldo, and “You Made Me Feel So Bad” by Horan and Fuscaldo. 

“I rehearsed the first line–up of The Mauds when Jimy was still in high school and hand picked them to replace us (the Shadows of Knight as the house band) when we left The Cellar (the famous teen club in Arlington Heights, IL) to play other places,” said Jimy Sohns while remembering his friend. “Jimy even toured and sang (in my place) with The Shadows when I was sick.”

Following “Hold On,” in 1968 the Mauds released the biggest single of their career, “Soul Drippin’,” which featured the horn section of Walter Parazaider, Lee Loughnane, and Jim Pankow, as well as keyboardist Robert Lamm. “These musicians were so inspired by the recording session that they went on to form their own group, C.T.A., later to become Chicago” Rogers said in an interview. The song charted at No. 85 on the Billboard singles chart and locally at No.16 on WCFL and No. 12 on WLS radio. 

With Jimy Rogers as the leader of the band throughout its lifespan, the band personnel grew and changed in 1969 when Richard Tufo joined on organ, Tim Coniglio left and Denny Spiegel was added with his “outasight screech trumpet” according to an old fan club newsletter. Frank Laurie also played trumpet, and trombone was added with Jim Zollers. Bill Sunter left and was replaced by Mike Schwab. The single “Satisfy My Hunger” featured Rogers on acoustic guitar, and the flip side, “Brother Chickie” was an instrumental featuring Rich Tufo’s jazzy organ. Sam Alessi was also on keyboards for a while during this period and again later in 1999 at the Cellar Reunion concert (Arlington Heights, IL).
Unlike his Chicago contemporaries who had a more pop sound and were mostly inspired and influenced by the Beatles, Rogers cooked up a much more soulful musical stew that worked well with his raspy vocal style. Along with other 1960s–1970s rockers,[6] Rogers was a disciple of rhythm and blues and what became known as “the Chicago Sound”.[6] While the ‘British Invasion’ was overtaking American rock music, the Mauds were different from other area bands, according to Bob Stroud’s biography, because of the inspiration they found in soul music. 

“Lead singer Jimy Rogers possessed the beginnings of a truly legitimate set of blue-eyed soul pipes,” wrote Stroud. “Under the cover of night, these five teenage, suburban white boys were sneaking into the various South side soul emporiums to bear witness to their heroes … Sam & Dave, [Otis] Redding and [Curtis] Mayfield.” Rogers worked with a variety of stars including Carole King and Stephen Stills, telling friends that “one of the greatest honors” of his career “was being asked to sing at a memorial concert the night Otis Redding was killed”.

“I remember watching Jimy and The Mauds back in 1970 at the Wild Goose at an outdoors show in Oak Lawn,” said Jim Peterik, of Ides Of March. “What a supreme frontman Jimy was. He was one of my role models from that moment on and "Soul Drippin’” is still one of my all–time favorite songs.“[2] Dick Biondi, broadcasting legend of WLS (AM), has continued to state “wherever I’ve gone, wherever I’ve worked, one of the best recordings to ever come out of the city of Chicago is “Soul Drippin’ by the Mauds.” It was written by Dick “Daddy Dewdrop” Monda, who sent Jimy an email a few months before Rogers’ death, saying: “I just wanted to thank Jimy for his incredible readings of my songs. It changed my life and gave me the impetus to go on with my career.” 

In 1970, the band included Marv Jonesi on guitar, Sam Alessi on Hammond organ, Mike Schwab (Groucho) on bass, and Denny Horan on drums. John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd were frequent visitors to the Mauds shows during this period, particularly in the Rush Street bars. It is rumored that the original Blues Brothers skit on Saturday Night Live was a “take off” of the Mauds “White Soul.” The Mauds signed with RCA and recorded a single of Carole King’s ballad, “Man Without A Dream.” This proved to be prophetic, as the single failed to get airplay and suddenly it was Jimy Rogers who had become the man without a dream.[4] The Mauds disbanded in 1971, after just a few years and a handful of hits together and the band changed their name to "Flash”, leaving Marv Jonesi on guitar, John Christy on Hammond Organ, John Hardy on bass and Marc Coplan on drums playing around Chicago, recording a demo for Columbia records, and trying to make it in L.A. 

When they played the legendary Whisky a Go Go in 1971, a review written on May 1, 1971 in Billboard magazine said, “Flash’s set here April 13 was a model for other groups to follow…the final number saw something quite unusual for the Whisky. Rogers walked into the crowd like a troubadour and went from table to table, eventually got the usually staid Whisky crowd harmonizing with the band.”[9] Al Kooper called Rogers, “the next Mick Jagger” and started on a project with Columbia Records that never came to fruition because of Kooper’s legal difficulties with the label over Lynyrd Skynyrd. Rogers then retired from the music business temporarily and spent a decade as a hairstylist in L.A. He cut the hair of many celebrities and it is said that he created Barry Manilow’s famous mane.
Returning home from California to care for his ailing mother in the 1980s, Jimy Rogers became aware of successful latter day revivals of his '60s–era peers like Shadows of Knight, The Buckinghams and The Ides of March. After his mother died in 1999, Rogers was contacted by concert organizers about reuniting the Mauds for a 1999 show celebrating the Cellar, a legendary '60s music venue in Arlington Heights. He put a band together including Denny Horan on drums, Sam Alesi on keyboards/bass, and James Scalfani on backup vocals. “When we played at a Cellar reunion show … it was like we were back in the 1960s again,” Mr. Rogers told the Chicago Tribune. “The crowd was going wild, and it felt so good. It made me remember what a good effect the band had on people.” 

Inspired to carry the Mauds forward into the new millennium, Rogers formed a new version in 2000[2] that included Al Ciner (American Breed and Rufus) on guitar, Mike Arnold on keyboards, Jerry Smith (Flock) on bass, and Bob Melville on drums. Gradually personnel were added and changed, and the new Mauds continued playing and recording, including sold-out appearances at Ravinia Festival and the Park West. The 10-piece band during this period was together approximately 8 years and featured Jimy Rogers on lead vocal, Michael Flynn on guitar, Bill LeClair on keyboards, Dave Forte on bass, Chris Drehobl on drums, Quent Lang on sax, Paul Redman on trombone, Steve O’brien on trumpet; Veronica Stanford and Jocelyn Mallard on backup vocals. They put out a live CD, “Soul Attitude” in 2005 and a studio album, “Souldier On” that included guest performances by Howard Levy (Flecktones) on harmonica, Vanessa Davis on vocals, Pat Fleming on guitar, and Greg Rzab (Black Crowes) on bass in 2007. 

The Mauds have had great support throughout the media in Chicago throughout the years. Dick Biondi of WLS has been a fan since the '60s. Bob Stroud of WDRV included “Hold On” on his Rock ‘n’ Roll Roots CD No. 3, and “Soul Drippin’” on CD #5. Bob Sirott, of Channel 11, WTTW included the Mauds as one of the major influences in Chicago rock in his PBS special, Chicago Stories. WGN radio featured an interview with Jimy Rogers in their series, “The Secret History of Chicago Music” which also included an article in the Chicago Reader. Rogers was also featured in the documentary film, “Player: A Rock ‘n’ Roll Dream” by Greg Herriges in 2006….wiki…~




Originally formed in 1965 singer/frontman Jimy Rogers, The Mauds started out as a covers band, playing parties, dances and Chicago clubs. Following a series of personnel changes, by 1966 the line up consisted of Rogers, rhythm guitarist Timmy Coniglio, lead guitarist Robert Fuzzy Fuscaldo, bassist Billy Winter, and drummer Phil Weinberg. Initially signed to Bill Traut’s Chicago based-Dunwich label, the band debuted with the 1967 single 'Hold On’ b/w 'C'mon and Move’ (Dunwich catalog number 160). The single generated considerable local attention with Mercury Records subsequently purchasing national distribution rights. Reissued under Mercury catalog number 72694 and backed by Mercury’s promotional power, the reissued single hit # 114 on the pop charts. The single was followed by 'When Something Is Wrong (with My Baby’ b/w 'You Make Me Feel So Bad’ (Mercury catalog number 72720). 
As was standard marketing policy, Mercury subsequently released a supporting album. Produced by George Badonsky and Bill Traut, 1967’s “The Mauds Hold On” offered up a mix of the earlier singles, pop and soul covers, and a pair of Fuscaldo-penned originals. Exemplified by tracks like 'Harlem Shuffle’, 'Knock On Wood’ and 'You Must Believe Me’ to my ears the results were energetic, if frequently less than awe-inspiring. With the band normally sticking close to the original arrangements anyone familiar with the original versions was left to wonder why they bothered … Even worse, a couple of their song choices were just plain bad. Propelled by a fey performance from Rogers 'When Something Is Wrong (with My Baby)’ was a clunker through and through; they managed to reduce 'Mercy, Mercy, Mercy’ to cocktail jazz, and they somehow managed to turn Isaac Hayes and David Porter’s 'Hold On’ into something dull and forgettable.. On the other hand Rogers had a likeable voice; the band’s playing was decent (though the horn arrangements were occasionally quite clunky), and the originals were actually quite good. 'C'mon and Move’ may have been the funkiest track on the album, while 'You Made Me Feel So Bad’ was the best rocker. Initially a major disappointment, though it’s grown on me the more I’ve played it….Bad Cat…~






Credits 

Backing Vocals – The Maidens 
Bass, Vocals – Billy Winter 
Drums – Phil Weinberg (3) 
Guitar – Fuzzy Fuscaldo 
Lead Guitar, Vocals – Jimy Rogers 
Rhythm Guitar, Brass – Timmy Coniglio


Tracklist 
1 Harlem Shuffle 2:55 
2 Knock On Wood 2:25 
3 When Something Is Wrong (With My Baby) 2:35 
4 Look At Granny Run Run 2:25 
5 Mercy, Mercy, Mercy 5:17 
6 Hold On 2:23 
7 You Must Believe Me 2:43 
8 You Don’t Know Like I Know 2:34 
9 C'Mon And Move 2:03 
10 Ha Ha Ha 2:20 
11 You Made Me Feel So Bad 2:05 

Mariah “Mariah” 1975 US Hard Rock Classic Rock


Mariah “Mariah” 1975 US Hard Rock Classic Rock
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https://vk.com/wall312142499_9429

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http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x238n8q


Here is a Chicago band with a huge story that crosses several artists / bands. This band began with the name The Jamestown Massacre in 1967. The two exponents of the group were Vic (VJ) Comforte and David Bickler. 

The band played throughout Chicago during the years 1969 through 1974, and had contact with people like Jim Peterick, Barry Mraz and Bob De Stock. The band went through several training changes. There is a connection to Survivor with Bickler, Sullivan and Peterick, all with one hand on the band’s destiny. In this way, Mariah decided to move from Chicago to Los Angeles to promote themselves, and a contract with United Artists, its rd album andwas born the following year in 1976. If you like bands like Emperor, Starcastle, Doobie Brothers and Legs Diamond, then this beautiful album with the flavor of the 70’s is supposed to mess with your world.Strong and melodic vocal harmonies are found in abundance in this album. The dual guitar work Fogerty and Sullivan pop and shine all the way, but it is the keyboard / O rgão Mark Ayers giving the band its color. Ayers “plowed” her work with the same enthusiasm as Herbe Schildt and Mike Prince. Starting with ‘Hey Mama’ the band tore Foghat as an enthusiastic dance number. 'Rock And Roll Band’ is similar to the Boston song of the same name, which by the lyrics, seems very autobiographical. You conhe c and the letter .. “We arewe’re just another band out of Boston … "In that case, Mariah’s lyrics are seen as” we were born in Chicago almost a year ago … six guys working together to have a show .. “Usually this is a Mystic Lady 'takes on the person of Legs Diamons, with the ever-present organ hovering in the background.Also there is the low-plow of’ Reunion ’, the harmony Starcastle as a vocal, raises the band from the ground. 

Slightly different is the bar-room boogie of 'Asleep At The Wheel’, light and fun. 'Broadway’ also has a dancing blackbeat style, but diverts to a hard-rocking middle-ground as it progresses. 'Nomad Man’ is a heavy acoustic taste with an occasional guitar solo and intense, shining from start to finish, Firefall and America style. The featured track on the album is the incredible 'Feel It’ as a point of reference for Creed, Emperor and countless others. The album ends with another electric / acoustic endeavor 'I Was Born’. The harmonies continue to flow in abundance…..~


By 1974 the line-up had coalesced around keyboardist Mark Ayers, bassist Ed Burek, singer Comforte, drummer Wayne DiVarko, and lead guitarists Len Fogerty and Frankie Sullivan. Embolden by their Warner Brother contract they decided to relocate to Los Angeles. After changing their name to Mariah, the group scored a contract with United Artists, making their album debut with 1975’s cleverly-titled "Mariah”. Produced by Bob Destocki, there wasn’t anything particularly original across these nine tracks with the band wholesale re-purposing influences from a broad spectrum of groups including The Doobies’ smooth vocals, Foghat-styled boogie rock, Kansas and Styx-styled lite progressive moves, and Uriah Heep-styled heaviness. Songs like 'Reunion’ and 'Broadway’ were great for playing spot-the-influences. That said, the nine tracks were uniformly enjoyable; full of sparkling, radio-ready melodies; nice vocal harmonies, and enough hooks to please any top-40 dj. Comforte had the kind of voice that was perfectly suite for the AOR genre - tough, but friendly and commercial, while the band’s Fogerty-Sullivan twin lead guitar attack was an added bonus on tracks like 'Rock and Roll Band’. Personal highlights were the closing rocker 'I Was Born’ and the first single 'Hay Mama’. Baseline your expectations and this could be a nice surprise….Bad Cat…~


Credits 

Bass Guitar – Ed Burek 
Crew – Joe Dorosz, Tom Henrie 
Crew [Road Manager] – Don D'Agostino 
Directed By [Direction] – Asher Dann, Bruce Glatman 
Drums – Wayne DiVarco 
Keyboards – Mark Ayers (2) 
Lead Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Vocals – Len Fogerty 
Lead Guitar, Vocals – Frank Sullivan* 
Lead Vocals, Percussion – V. J. Comforte 


Tracklist 
Hey Mama 3:09 
Rock And Roll Band 4:16 
Mystic Lady 2:42 
Reunion 6:16 
Asleep At The Wheel 2:54 
Broadway (How You Gonna Keep 'Em Down On Broadway After They’ve Seen The Farm?) 4:14 
Nomad Man 3:24 
Feel It 3:52 
I Was Born 4:24 

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