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Friday, 20 April 2018

The Sonics “This Is the Sonics” 2015 US Garage Rock,Garage Punk


The Sonics “This Is the Sonics” 2015 US Garage Rock,Garage Punk  
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This Is the Sonics is their first studio album of all-new material by the garage-rock pioneers in 49 years, but what’s even more remarkable is how one of garage rock’s most legendary bands has dared to test their legend by making a record that spits, snarls, drools, honks, wails, and screams as if it were 1966 all over again.
If garage rock was conceived in the ’60s as the primal sound of teenage boredom, frustration, and angst, what does it mean when men in their seventies attempt to play it? There’s probably a deep and worthy discussion to be had somewhere in there, but the Sonics don’t give a shit about that, nor should they. The Tacoma band’s new release This Is the Sonics is their first studio album of all-new material in 49 years, and that fact alone is staggering. What’s even more remarkable, though, is how one of garage rock’s most legendary bands has dared to test their legend by making a record that spits, snarls, drools, honks, wails, and screams as if it were 1966 all over again. 
Granted, recording with Jim Diamond doesn’t hurt. The former Dirtbombs bassist and famed producer of the White Stripes’ self-titled debut spares no grime or fuzz. The album was recorded mono, live in the studio. “Bad Betty”, the most powerful original composition on the album, hints at the rock-appropriated folklore of Black Betty in its title while remaining gleefully ignorant of anything except how to pound a riff into the ground in execution. Vocalist/keyboardist Jerry Roslie sings of the wild, leather-clad woman who puts his own savagery to shame, the septeguenarian whooping and screeching like a tomcat in heat. 

Roslie is joined by fellow founding members Larry Parypa on guitar and vocals and Rob Lind on saxophone and vocals; the lineup is rounded out by bassist Freddie Dennis (a veteran of the Kingsmen, one of the Sonics’ Pacific Northwest garage-rock brethren in the ’60s) and drummer Dusty Watson. Together they lock into a single-minded, almost monomaniacal unit, pulverizing numbers like “Be a Woman” and “Spend the Night” into lumps of distorted, house-wrecking lust. Roslie’s voice, though, is the star. Still steeped in the R&B of his youth, his corroded pipes—which produced godlike shrieks on ’60s Sonics classics like “Strychnine”, “The Witch”, and “Have Love Will Travel”—sound somehow rawer…..by Jason Heller…Pitcfork….~


The garage rock revival is pretty ubiquitous. That nostalgia well runs deep. Seemingly every week another young band comes out of nowhere to release a solid album of fiery, fun riffage and lyrical content of questionable strength. Without knowing any of the back story, one listen to This Is the Sonics would suggest that it falls right into line with that movement. Nothing on the album indicates that these are in fact guys eligible for AARP releasing their first album of new music since 1967. That The Sonics sound as vibrant as they do is a remarkable feat, especially considering how similar this album sounds to your average garage rock record released by musicians 40 or 50 years younger. 
The Tacoma quintet is often cited as one of the earliest punk forebears, and has been noted as a major influence by acts like the White Stripes and Eagles of Death Metal. But though they’ve reformed in various states of being since 2007, the fact that they haven’t put out new music in nearly 50 years has relegated them to the role of “your favorite band’s favorite band” for many. 
Though the title announces some sort of definitive state, This Is the Sonics features only three of five members of the band’s classic lineup: vocalist/organist Gerry Roslie, guitarist Larry Parypa, and saxophonist Rob Lind. For a band dating back to the ’60s, that’s not a bad ratio. Their age isn’t evident in the songs, either; there’d be an easy joke to be made at the expense of a song called “I Don’t Need No Doctor” if the quintet didn’t so thoroughly roar through it. Later, “Save the Planet” insists that we need to save Earth because it’s the only planet that serves beer, and the rhythm pulses with a spacy bar room rumble to match. 
They keep up with the kids so convincingly, though, that The Sonics fall into the exact same traps. While the lyrics largely aim for cheeky goofballery, they occasionally flounder in eyeroll territory. From “Be a Woman”: “You make me feel like a man/ I gets as much as I can/ I do not break in your hand.” Later, on “You Can’t Judge a Book by the Cover”, Roslie grins, “You can’t judge sugar by looking at the cane/ You can’t judge a woman by looking at her man.” The song is a Bo Diddley cover, but it’s indicative of Roslie’s simple, sing-songy rhyme choices and winking delivery. 
While this isn’t a genre designed for poetry, there are some distracting clunkers amidst the fun. But thankfully, that “Be a Woman” dud is followed by a stone-cold guitar solo. If nothing else, This Is the Sonics shows fans of King Khan, the Black Lips, and the like that the Sonics were laying the groundwork decades ago and that garage rock remains just as much fun to play and listen to decades later…..by.. ADAM KIVEL…~


Punk before punk, garage rock before anyone flagged it, the Sonics’ 1965 Here Are the Sonics mixed Chuck Berry and Little Richard with greaseball white-boy originals. This reunion concedes nothing to the following half-century. Rob Lind still bleats sax like he’s pummeling a sandbag, Jerry Roslie’s howls would still make primal-scream therapist Arthur Janov plotz, and producer Jim Diamond drives Larry Parypa’s stabbing guitar in deeper than ever. The new songs sound vintage; so do the covers: Their take on the Kinks’ “The Hard Way” out-rocks the original, echoing the Brits’ more loutish “You Really Got Me.” They can still teach their garage offspring a thing or two…..By Will Hermes…Rolling Stone…~


Rock and roll was pronounced dead many years ago. Of course, we, the faithful, know that’s a lie; there is proof all around us that it can live and breathe if given the chance. 
While many of the young'uns are giving it a go, it seems the elders have to come back in to show us how it’s done. Please welcome, the Sonics. 
In the early ‘60s, the Sonics were among a handful of powerhouse bands from the great Northwest including the Wailers, the Kingsmen and Paul Revere & the Raiders. Above them all, the Sonics stood tall, dishing out a fierce, almost brutal attack that would inspire many along the way, unknowingly laying the template for much of what was to be known as punk rock a decade later. 
With a stripped down, primal approach – inspired by gritty R&B and originators like Little Richard – the Sonics issued a few albums and an essential batch of singles back in '65 and '66, including such classics as “The Witch,” “Shot Down,” “Boss Hoss” and “Psycho.” Their legend lived on among fans for decades, then in the late 2000’s, the unlikely happened when the band reunited to play a series of concerts around the world. With interest in the Sonics at an all time high, and heads turning at every stop, they carried on with live gigs. Now, in 2015, they have unleashed their first new album in almost 50 years, and guess what – This Is the Sonics freakin’ rocks! 
Original members Jerry Roslie (lead vocals, keyboards), Larry Parypa (guitar, vocals) and Bob Lind (sax, harmonica, vocals) are joined by Freddie Dennis, formerly of the Kingsmen and the Liverpool 5, on bass and vocals, and the youngster of the band, drummer Dusty Watson. All members are at or beyond the age of 70, except for Watson who is in his 50s. You can see people wincing and shaking their heads already: What do these old men think they are doing? Are they trying to relive their youth? Why don’t they just hang it up? To that we say, screw you! Any sort of ageism will be instantly shot down once the needle hits the groove on This Is the Sonics. 
A rousing version of the Ray Charles classic “I Don’t Need No Doctor” kicks off the album with more fire and passion than most bands a quarter their age. From that first track on, it’s a rapid fire assault, one punch after another, never letting up for a moment; there is no time for introspective ballads here. 
“Be a Woman,” written by Dave Faulker of the Hoodoo Gurus, hits next – and it hits hard. The album’s first single, “Bad Betty,” written by Lind, is the most pure example of rock and roll you are likely to hear all year, as the vocals practically rip the cones on your speakers while the band tears up the rest. 
The record combines original material alongside some choice covers including a monstrous take on “Sugaree.” No, not the Grateful Dead song of the same name, but rather a song written in the late '50s by Marty Robbins. The Sonics, needless to say, inject it full of venom and steroids here, turning it into a classic of their own. 
“Living in Chaos” is about as primal as it gets. It’s sheer perfection from the rhythm, to the riff, to the lyric. Highlights are many, including a stomping take on the Kinks’ “The Hard Way.” 
“You can buy a one way ticket if you wanna go to Mars / You might be disappointed cause they got no whiskey bars,” Roslie states in “Save the Planet,” a song that avoids the NPR cliches of that sort of mission statement, by leveling things to a more basic premise: “Why would we ever move away from here / We’ve got rock and roll / We’ve got all the beer.” 
The 12-track album ends with another Lind composition, “Spend the Night,” which provides the perfect closer to this unhinged ride. Like most great albums, it’s over before you really know what hit you. 
The spirit of rock and roll is alive and well and we will gladly put this LP up against anything flying under that flag that is released this year. The Sonics play with a fire and passion that most bands – especially those of a certain age – can only dream of. We must also provide thumbs up to producer Jim Diamond who perfectly captures it all, even recording them in mono. The record has vintage vibe all over it to be sure, but it never sounds dated – rather, This Is the Sonics is very much alive….by Dave Swanson….~


These days it’s not unusual to hear talk of band reunions. It seems like every broken-up band eventually gets back together. Some of those, like Phish, Van Halen, or Genesis, seemed inevitable. Some bands, however, fall into the “unlikely” category. Usually that is due to bad blood within the band, especially in the case of groups like the Eagles, The Stone Roses, or The Police. All of those bands buried the hatchet, at least for a little while, and made triumphant comebacks, though a few others like The Smiths, The Byrds, or Dire Straits…well, we are not holding our breath. 
Even still, none of those reunions, real or hypothetical, are nearly as unlikely as the return of legendary Seattle garage-rockers The Sonics, whose last album of original material was called Boom, released in 1966, some 49 years ago. 
Who are The Sonics, you might ask? You are forgiven, if you don’t know. While they were one of the more successful of the mid-60s garage-rock boom, they never achieved major-label status or any real level of fame, and they soon split up to forge careers of the normal man. But their few records fell into the hands of many aspiring musicians and The Sonics wound up becoming major influences on bands in the punk, grunge, indie, and garage revival movements. Without The Sonics, there would be no Nirvana, Ramones, Stooges, Black Keys, White Stripes, or Pavement. Songs like “Strychnine”, “The Witch”, “Boss Hoss”, “Cinderella”, and “Have Love Will Travel” are the sonic blueprint for so much of what came later, whether directly from the records or filtered down through the ages, that their influence is almost immeasurable. Gerry Roslie’s gritty holler, Larry Parypa’s overdriven guitar leads, and Rob Lind’s reedy sax licks (a rarity in rock at that point) added a new level of grit to rock & roll. In short, those records kick ass. 
So after living more or less “normal” lives for 40 years or so, and occasionally reforming for one-offs, The Sonics reformed in earnest in 2007, performing at festivals around the world, and blowing audiences away once again. After so much time away from the biz, I don’t think anyone expected that the band would still have it, but they totally rose to the occasion, influencing a whole new generation of garage rockers (helping to define Little Steven’s Underground Garage channel on Sirius). In 2010, the band released an EP, with a few new songs and some live cuts, but it was a pretty obscure disc and it went largely without notice. 
Then came the news that The Sonics were working on a new album. Certain sectors of the music world were shocked that, after all this time, there would be a new album, but no one really expected it to be anything more than a pleasant afterthought, to bookend their career as a band. 

But then the record came out. 

Simply put, This Is The Sonics is the best comeback album…ever. Hell, it even betters the band’s initial output from the 60s. They come screaming right out of the gate with the gritty wail of “I Don’t Need No Doctor” and they just keep it coming. “Be A Woman”, “Black Betty”, and “The Hard Way” all rock harder than anything the Stooges ever put out, and the version of “You Can’t Judge A Book By Its Cover” is by far the best that has ever been recorded. “Sugaree” (not the Grateful Dead or Elizabeth Cotton song of the same name) is a dizzying track that sends every band they ever influenced back to Rock School, while “Leaving Here” proves itself to be the grungiest record to ever come out of Seattle. You could put Mark Lanegan in front of Mudhoney, with Dave Grohl on drums, and even they couldn’t make a record like this. 

Gerry Roslie might be 71 years old but his voice has lost none of its edge, and Larry Parypa’s guitar and Rob Lind’s sax scream and wail harder than anything you will hear from a band of 20-somethings. Original bassist Andy Parypa and drummer Bob Bennett were unable to commit and are replaced by the rhythm section of Freddie Dennis (bass) and Dusty Watson (drums), and their energy propels these recordings even more. This is music that makes you want to dance yourself dizzy. This is music that makes you want to drive a hundred miles an hour. This is music that makes you want to shout. 

The Sonics ain’t no ballad band, and they make that very clear as they roll through the classic, “Look At Little Sister”, another ferocious take that betters any version that came before, and “I Got Your Number” which pounds a four-on-the-floor that leaves you with no choice but to bang your head. “Living In Chaos” features one of Gerry Roslie’s greatest vocals….man, no one can scream like that. Every heavy metal and hardcore singer that ever lived wishes he can scream like that. “Save The Planet” may be slightly slower but it is still heavy and features one of the best lyrics on this album – “You can buy a one-way ticket if you want to go to Mars / you might be disappointed coz they got no risqué bars” and then goes on to say that we should “all get loose and drink a little brew” because “party time is here”. Ain’t that the truth. Closing out the album is the dirty, old-school punk thrash of “Spend The Night”, featuring the sort of overdriven power-chord riffery that made Dave Davies famous. 
And that’s it. In 32 minutes, The Sonics do what most bands can’t in their entire output. They make you BELIEVE. Despite what is proving to be a relatively massive success, I wouldn’t count on a follow up. Which is quite alright with me. No band could ever deliver a greater exclamation point than this. 
The Sonics prove it – 70 is the new 20. What are YOU doing?…..by  Chris Anderson…~


The Sonics, for those who aren’t familiar, are one of the first major acts of the garage rock genre. The band and its peers mainly specialized in rockin’ out harder than anyone else had in 1965. Their aggressive style had become so popular that they ended up actually influencing important acts like The Stooges, Nirvana, Bruce Springsteen, The Fall, and MC5. Much of the music they made in their early days was heavily influenced by the bands of their era like the Kinks, Beatles, Beach Boys, and Rolling Stones, and it only took one spin of their debut album to pick up on how deep the influences were, with the harmonized chorus of “Do You Love Me” or the bluesy melodies of The Rolling Stones in their R&B days. Now with the band being this old the idea of an album in 2015 may be a source of concern, considering how the members by this point are probably more fit for the retirement home as opposed to the recording studio. But with their comeback LP, This Is The Sonics, these guys prove to be as frantic and reckless as ever. And now with the help of producer Jim Diamond to bring out the fuzz to its maximum levels, one could easily put this alongside everything the Sonics did in their glory days in terms of reckless energy and general fun to be had while listening. 

The three remaining members from the original band, vocalist/keyboardist Gerry Rosley, saxophonist Rob Lind, and Guitarist Larry Parypa, are in their element on this album. Gerry Rosley’s vocals have aged remarkably well, allowing him to sing at full blast yet still sound old enough to complement the classic rock feel of the songs, and his keyboard playing brings an up-tempo feel to the dirty riffs and mean sax playing of his fellow members. Larry Parypa is still able to shred, and doesn’t hesitate to show off his guitar prowess. The songs still carry off a very very lively feel despite the band’s age, at first one might think it was still 1966 with how much the members put into each song. Old-school R&B is king in This Is The Sonics. Pounding riffs, exuberant keyboard playing, and bluesy melodies permeate every corner of this album. Consequently, This Is The Sonics really doesn’t have any weak spots, the entire album is a fun rock-n-roll jam for anyone, including older fans from the band’s early days. 

This Is The Sonics’s biggest asset is how true it Is to the band’s original style, while never sounding stale in any of its tracks thanks to fresh production and the general enthusiasm of the members’ playing. The album pays tribute to the classic material of the band’s early days instead of trying to capitalize on a legacy. The members, while obviously past their prime, have never really reached an expiration date, and come across as just as strong if not stronger than ever as musicians and songwriters. And finally, This Is The Sonics is just a very fun listen from beginning to end. Addictive melodies and obvious love for what they do have kept The Sonics from coming across as anything less than a great band, and rarely miss a beat on their wonderful comeback LP….sputnik…~



Credits 

Bass, Lead Vocals – Freddie Dennis 
Drums, Vocals – Dusty Watson 
Guitar, Vocals – Larry Parypa 
Keyboards [Additional], Piano [Additional] – Jim Diamond 
Lead Vocals, Piano, Keyboards – Jerry Roslie* 
Saxophone, Harp, Vocals – Rob Lind 


Tracklist 
1 I Don’t Need No Doctor
2 Be A Woman
3 Bad Betty
4 You Can’t Judge A Book By The Cover
5 The Hard Way
6 Sugaree
7 Leaving Here
8 Look At Little Sister
9 I Got Your Number
10 Livin’ In Chaos
11 Save The Planet
12 Spend The Night 

Thursday, 19 April 2018

Älgarnas Trädgård “Delayed” 2001 Sweden Psych Space Rock (Previously unreleased second album recorded 1973–1974)


Älgarnas Trädgård “Delayed” 2001 Sweden Psych Space Rock (Previously unreleased second album recorded 1973–1974) 
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After the magnificent album “Framtiden är ett svävande skepp förankrat I forntiden” (The future is a hovering ship anchored in the past) from 1972, ÄLGARNAS TRADGARD (Garden of the Elks) went into the studio again to record their second album. The first album was actually a loosely improvised studio experiment that turned out very well. They were trying to do as much as they could come up with in the studio, with Moog synth, medieval instruments, sound effects, bells and god knows what. “Framtiden är ett svävande skepp förankrat i forntiden” was actually nominated for the Swedish Grammy music price. 
The band however split up before the second album was mixed, and it was put on the shelf, until now. It’s incredible that we now, 27 years later finally can hear the album. When they were putting the album together, they decided to mix it the way they would’ve done it back then. I can only say that it’s a shame that this album have been kept secret for so long. Even though this “new” album has many similarities to the first, it also has differences. “Delayed” has a clearer structure than the first album and it’s also heavier at times. Even though it’s hard to find any bands to compare ÄLGARNAS TRADGARD with, there are some reminiscences CAPTAIN BEEFHEART, HAWKIND and KING CRIMSON. 

Of course I also have to mention the nice foldout CD-booklet with a beautiful cover artwork by Jan Ternald. Jan also did the well-known cover artwork for Bo HANSSON’s “Ur trollkarlens hatt”. The band ÄLGARNAS TRADGARD doesn’t exist today, but some of the musicians are still active today in rather famous Swedish bands such as FLÄSKKVARTETTEN and TWICE A MAN….by Greger …~


This posthumous release is just as good as the sole debut album, however different it may be. Actually they will disband in 76 without having to managed to release these 74 recordings. 
The only real two links you will find between these albums are that all tracks on this album are similar to the most out-of-place track Ring Of Saturn on their first album: this album is definitely more of a scoarching space-rock /psych rock than the debut that was more in the acid-folk prog realm. The other link is actually reverse as the second part of the Almond raga track brings you back to the debut album with its strong indian music flavour. The last track Childhood Trees veers into more ambient music with soft vocals monotonous chants not being really on par with the rest of the album , but does not alter the average album contents. 
For those into heroic fantasy , the artwork of the booklet ies reminiscent of a cross between Roger Dean worlds and Pallas’s The Sentinel artwork but done on computer imagery. Impressive fold out mini-poster but no real link with the music….by Sean Trane …~


I couldn’t wait to get this one after being so impressed by their debut. I called their first one a bit of a monster, I mean it was unique and not for the faint of heart. This one is called “Delayed” because the band had recorded it, but then split up before it was released. So 27 years later here it is. Quite the story. This one does have some similarities to the debut, but it didn’t hit me the same way at all. I’m probably in the minority here, but for me their debut is easily the best of the two, and of course my favourite. 
“Takeoff” has a great beat to it once it gets going. Pounding drums and some vocal melodies early. The bass to follow is throbbing. I have to say that the drumming is probably the most impressive feature of this album for me. The spacey ending seems to go on and on as it blends into the next song “Intersteller Cruise”. Percussion is added a minute in. About 3 minutes in we get an uptempo melody with pounding drums. Sitar comes in, giving this passage a strong Indian flavour. A great rhythm after 8 minutes. Floods of mellotron arrive as the song calms right down before 12 minutes. It ends with a spacey soundscape with piano. “Reflection” is less then a minute of mellotron. 
“Almond Raga” opens with drums and violin. Guitar comes in, and like on the first track it sounds distorted. I don’t like it. The tempo picks up before 2 minutes. Violin takes over before 3 minutes followed by a pastoral section with an Indian flavour. “Beetlewater” is my favourite song on here. It has an eerie intro that is replaced by an uptempo soundscape that includes violin. It brightens somewhat before 2 minutes.Some nice bass lines as drums pound away. The violin continues to be prominant. “The Arrival Of Autumn” opens in a pastoral way.It starts to build 1 ½ minutes in. The annoying distorted guitar is back until it calms back down. It drifts along with keys, drums and bass breaking through occasionally. “My Childhood Trees” is spacey with strange, psychedelic vocals to follow. Ominous sounding flute in the intro and after the vocals stop. Vocals return. This is a slow moving and haunting track. 
If you want to be adventerous check this band out. They have a unique psychedelic sound…. by Mellotron Storm …~


ÄLGARNAS TRÄDGÅRD (Swedish, meaning Garden of the Elks) released just one album in the early 70’s but recorded another one in 73-74. For some reasons the album was released as late as in 2001, aptly titled Delayed. I hadn’t heard their music before, and I was positively surprised by this one. It’s mostly instrumental, with some hazy, spacey psychedelia as in Saucerful Of Secrets -era PINK FLOYD (also comparisons to HAWKWIND make sense), serenity-meets-edginess à la 70’s KING CRIMSON, and a certain folk-flavoured Scandinavian air to it all. BO HANSSON is mentioned too in the earlier reviews 
The track lengths are missing, but they vary between very brief and very long. I yet haven’t listened to this many times enough to give more detailed comments of separate tracks, but the closing song I do remember very well. it is based on an Edith Södergran poem and it’s sung in Swedish (one may ask why it isn’t titled ‘Min barndom’ instead of 'My Childhood’). It’s a very fragile and atmospheric track. I came to think of the art film Stalker by Andrei Tarkovski, or more precisely, one of its most poetic, dialogueless scenes with similar eerie music (camera slowly moving above the surface of the water with all kinds of small things and organic waste in it, remember that?). And the falsetto, introvert singing reminded me of Jonsi of SIGUR ROS. 
An interesting, deeply artistic album, though most likely not for everyone’s taste….by Matti …~


Collectors of arcane ethno-prog esoterica will remember the first (and, for a long time, only) album by Älgarnas Trädgård as a haunting mood piece: Space Rock without the Rock, and closely tied to older, more terrestrial pagan art traditions. The sudden appearance of a second album in 2001, almost three decades after the master tapes were mothballed and the original group disbanded, must have come as a complete surprise, not least for the new album’s 180-degree reverse in style toward a more accessible psych-rock style. 
It’s hard to even credit the same musicians for both efforts, the difference is so startling. The later album is more immediately appealing (because it actually rocks, and hard), but the music lacks the unique, supernatural eeriness of the band’s uncanny debut. Too many other likeminded off-planet explorers, most of them located south of the Baltic Sea in Krautrock Germany, had already staked out similar cosmic rock territory. But the Scandinavians brought their own flavors to the table, laced with a generous dash of the same Indian seasonings common in northern Europe at the time: sitars, tablas and such. 
The atmospheric electric violin suggests a familiarity with the spacier ragas of early Amon Düül II, circa “Yeti”. And the quotation from Gustav Holst (“Mars, the Bringer of War”, of course) links the band to the more earthbound symphonic rock trends of the 1970s. Only on the last few tracks is the band’s original magic restored, in particular during the ghostly finale of “My Childhood Trees”, a shifting seven-minute aurora of ancient Nordic mystery, with a spectral voice from somewhere above the Arctic Circle drifting into the album’s long, repetitive fade-out. 
The production is a little rough around the edges, sounding not unlike an impromptu live-in-the-studio recording. But the unpolished vitality of the playing compensates for any lack of refinement, to a point where the album appears almost implausibly fresh today (and thus would have been ahead of its time in 1974). Even after 27-years in limbo, there’s enough residual enchantment here to bump my otherwise conservative evaluation up a notch, and send a belated shiver of psychedelic excitement down a sympathetic spine…by Neu!mann …~
GREAT!!! Dynamic and closer to chamber/symphonic rock bands, though being psych/folk/kraut/space rock. Their first album was maybe more mystical, and perhaps more psychedelic, but I’d say this has it, too. And really, this sounds timeless. Not 2000’s stuff….by…Fastro …~


2001 release of what was the 2nd Algarnas Tradgard album; originally recorded in 1973-74, but never released (until this CD rescued these recordings from oblivion). Exact same lineup as witnessed on their epic debut from 1972 Framtiden Är Ett Svävande Skepp, Förankrat I Forntiden (or The Future is a Hovering Ship Anchored in the Past). And what a fantastic offering…it slowly extends into meta-improvisations with distant guitars, heavily effected organs, swirling strings, plenty of space, reaching an early peak-build amidst the detritus floating through the 12-minute “Interstellar Cruise.” Later, an Eastern-themed campfire freakout (sitars, tablas, Yod-chant) breaks out, then a bit of the mellow reverbed flute, later still a long vocal loop fade out over some well placed drones. One could say this record has a bit of everything. One would be correct. Astonishing that it has lain dormant in the vaults for so long….~


The Swedish group Algarnas Tradgard (Garden of the Elks) were formed in 1969 and played an active part in the progressive movement of the next seven years, often performing at free festivals. Their 1971 debut album was a radical exploration of the new possibilities opened up by creative use of the recording studio as an instrument, in a similar vein to Faust and other German experimenters, while also pulling in folk and medieval influences. On stage they would improvise more upon riffs and extensive touring led to their sound becoming heavier and more rocky, yet with complex arrangements and dynamic interplay between their wide range of instruments: violins, cello, zither, sitar, tabla and flute added to the conventional rock band of bass, drums, guitars and keyboards. 
They recorded a second album in 1973-74, but its release was “Delayed” until 2001 (hence the album’s name). The band finally split up in 1976. No other official recordings exist, although there must be bootlegs. Next I’d like to check out the musical careers of the band members… 
- taken from The Music of Algarnas Tradgard …..~


ÄLGARNAS TRÄDGÅRD are a seminal, 6-piece Swedish combo who made one album in 1972, a cult classic and masterpiece of psychedelia that could have come straight out of the 'Kraut’ school of Space Rock. After the release of their album, they kept on playing live for a while, even recording a full album’s worth of new material in 1973-74. But it wasn’t until 2001 that this material was mixed and released, on a cd entitled “Delayed”. 
Their 1972 classic, “Framtiden ar ett Svavande Skepp, Forankrat I Forntiden”, is a veritable testimony to the halcyon days of hippiedom - a time when grown men, like children playing with forbidden colours, were popping hallucinogenic bonbons and experimenting with psychedelic sounds in their quest for mind-expanding adventures and altered states of consciousness. However, ÄLGARNAS TRÄDGÅRD’s music never lapses into drugged-out silliness or aimless noodling. It ranges from earnest, to Medieval, to completely creepy - a sort of 'RIO meets folk’. They concoct some earthly (and unearthly) sounds using a combination of traditional, modern rock instruments and ethnic/archaic ones, the result being a spectacular blend of slow-smoking psychedelia with a strong vernacular Swedish folk bent. Their guitar-based, trance-like music is reminiscent of ASH RA TEMPEL; it also shares GONG’s organic mayhem and the hypnotic qualities of early TANGERINE DREAM. If you can imagine a Nordic version of AMON DÜÜL II or ASH RA TEMPEL, you’ll have a pretty good idea of what they sound like. The 2001 cd “Delayed”, which makes heavier use of drums and guitars, is yet another marvellously atmospheric and creative mixture of prog and psychedelia. 
Highly recommended for Krautrock aficionados as well as for fans of CAN and PINK FLOYD, circa “Ummagumma”…..~


This is the first time ever release of the mythical unreleased 2nd album by this legendary Swedish psychedelic Acid Space band. Recorded 27 years ago, but ended up on the shelf, until now!! As goods as their stunning and classic debut album. Cosmic acid space psychedelic folk from 1974. The following information was copied from the popculturepress homepage: More than a quarter century after its inception, this is the world debut of the second album from the Scandinavian progressive rock ensemble known in English as “Garden Of The Elks.” Delayed shows a heavier, angrier side to the group. Perhaps the sublimated violence is a musical portrait of the tensions that caused the original group to split after these 1973-4 recordings. The tapes remained unmixed until the stars were aligned, making possible this 2001 release. Because of the state of the music this is previously unheard even in a bootleg format. Never even bootlegged before, the Delayed recordings feature the same lineup that gave the world the cloud-like extended improvisations of Framtiden är ett svävande skepp, förankrat I forntiden (The future is a hovering ship anchored in the past). The psychedelic jams vary from the 12-minute extraterrestrial odyssey “Interstellar Cruise” to the Indian freakout “Almond Raga.” (TTS)….~


Credits 
Bass, Drum [Handdrum], Zither – Mikael Johanson* 
Cello, Sitar – Sebastian Öberg 
Composed By [Compositions By] – Älgarnas Trädgård 
Drums, Tabla [Tablas], Percussion – Dennis Lundh* 
Mellotron, Synthesizer [Moog Modulator], Organ, Electric Piano [Electronic Piano], Mixed By, Cover – Jan Ternald 
Recorded By, Mixed By – Anders Lind 
Violin, Vocals [Vocal], Flute – Andreas Brandt



Tracklist 
Takeoff 7:55 
Interstellar Cruise 12:39 
Reflection 0:40 
Almond Raga 7:38 
Beetlewater 3:37 
The Arrival Of Autumn 4:41 
My Childhood Trees 7:32 

Jimmy Stevens "Don’t Freak Me Out" 1972 UK Pop Rock,Country Rock (with Maurice Gibb - Bee Gees,John Bonham,Peter Frampton & Mike Harris (Spooky Tooth)


Jimmy Stevens  "Don’t Freak Me Out" 1972 UK Pop Rock,Country Rock (with Maurice Gibb - Bee Gees,John Bonham,Peter Frampton & Mike Harris (Spooky Tooth)
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 I came across this when ploughing through The Unsorted in the Cultureberg Vault. Jimmy was a Liverpudlian musician whose only Lp was a result of the patronage of Maurice Gibb, Lulu and Robert Stigwood. On the cover he looks like the mid point between Chas and Dave. The music reminds me of Randy Newman’s take on ‘Gone Dead Train’ on the Performance soundtrack, barrelling along on 88 percussion keys. His vocal is Randyesque, but irony free, with a similarity to Terry Allen on Lubbock (on Everything). A bit of research (Okay, googling) reveals he toured as support to Emerson, Lake and Palmer (unimaginable) and the Bee Gee’s. He preferred the latter experience. I read his Myspace page which has a detailed, atmospheric and interesting biography/autobiography, full of close calls with career breaks and rubbed shoulders. There’s a contemporary cutting there in which the journalist likens him to “a fat John Lennon”. Worse things to be. What might spark a reissue (I could find no trace of one) is the presence of John Bonham on 2 tracks, including the title track linked to below. They sound on vinyl to be well suited; to read the article on Jimmy’s myspace page, they both seemed to like a drink as well. Also on there is Peter Frampton and the aforementioned Gibb brother, whose production company Moby (not that one) Jimmy was signed to.The LP was released in the States as Paid My Dues, another of the better tracks. There’s a few tracks that veer into sentiment like Sweet child of Mine (not that one), but it’s mostly earthy rock and roll with no frills but with grit and a surfeit of feel. Jimmy disappeared back to family in Liverpool but he paid his dues and he made a good LP which has stood the test of time. Here’s the title track…~


Jimmy Stevens was a British singer-songwriter, who in 1972 received a management contract with Robert Stigwood and under the production supervision of Maurice Gibb recorded his only album to date. 
The album was recorded in two sessions. The first took place in April 1972 and, alongside Jimmy Stevens on the piano, John Bonham from Led Zeppelin on the hangar and Alan Kendall as the guitarist. But Bonham soon had other obligations and was replaced by Heydon Jones. Maurice Gibb initially did not appear as a musician, but later added bass and organ to some songs. Bill Shepherd was responsible for the orchestration. 
The second session took place with Peter Frampton (then at Humble Pie) on the electric guitar and Spooky Tooth drummer Mick Kellie in May 1972. The arrangements came from Gerry Shury, percussion played the then tour drummer of Bee Gees, Chris Karan. 
The album appeared in the summer of 1972, initially only in England on the label Atlantic Records. Stevens was sent on tour and played on the autumn tour of England in the opening act of Emerson, Lake & Palmer, where he had no easy time. 
In January 1973, the album (under the title 'Paid My Dues’) appeared in the US on the newly founded RSO label in the US, where Jimmy Stevens played the opening act of the Bee Gees. However, the album sold neither this side nor the other side of the Atlantic and in the autumn of 1973, were the stages on which Stevens appeared, the smaller English clubs. 
In 2007, Jimmy Stevens self-released this album as a remastered version on CDr over the Internet…..~


The first and only album released by English musician Jimmy Stevens in 1972, in the United States it was released in January 1973 and was called “Paid My Dues” … the album was made in two sessions in which participated from the famous John Bonham on drums in several tracks (both loved to drink with Jimmy), Peter Frampton, Mike Harris (Spooky Tooth), Mike Kelly, Alan Kendall)…~


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“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

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